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    After seeing many organizations I saw that SAASOA is very enterprising and are a core of the business community in and around Alabama. SAASOA is doing a lot of  good for the people in the community by doing many activities like Blood Camps, Health Fairs, Volunteering activities, Scholarships, etc. I am lucky to be a part of a group like this and I encourage my friends and community members to be a part of SAASOA.

    -Mahesh Batavia, Liquor Store Member, Mobile
  • In the nearly 2 years that we have been partnered with SAAAOA we have seen a growth in sales, profits and customer count in their group’s stores. The key to maximizing this is to become more seamless in execution,pricing and positioning. I am excited about the future with SAASOA and Coca-Cola.

     

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    SAASOA’s intention is to help their members and our community should support it by joining it. SAASOA is very committed to help our community and the financial profits are very substantial.

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    Each and every member of SAASOA have their own voice. When it comes to making decision everyone is involved. We are like one big family!
     
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  • The attention to detail and the constant striving to attain complete compliance by it's members is a true testament to the dedication the leaders of this organization have to it's success.  I am proud, on the behalf of Hackney, to be associated with such a successful and influential group such as SAASOA.
     
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Posted by on in Business & Community

It is the age of gourmet coffee and its connoisseur creatures, otherwise known as millennials. But are today’s convenience stores up to the higher java challenge?

The data indicates the convenience channel could benefit from making more of an effort. From the latest preparation techniques to sourcing the beans themselves, going the extra gourmet mile is what the new generation of coffee lovers want; they are clearly not satisfied with their parents' drip brew, according to the National Coffee Association (NCA).

The association’s latest National Coffee Drinking Trends (NCDT) report revealed:

  • Daily consumption of espresso-based beverages has nearly tripled since 2008.
  • Between 2008 and 2016, past-day consumption of gourmet coffee beverages soared from 13 percent to 36 percent among 18- to 24-year-olds, and from 19 percent to 41 percent for those aged 25-39.
  • For espresso-based beverages alone, the jump went from 9 percent to 22 percent for the 18-24 age group, and from 8 percent to 29 percent for the 25-39 group.

Here are six quick market sips/industry tips to help c-stores reach higher coffee ground:

Compared with adjacent retail channels, U.S. convenience stores have boasted relative strength and sales growth in recent years. Built on the premise of speed, convenience stores are modeled to deliver on specific consumer needs that competing channels don’t yet address fully. While Nielsen research suggests that the strength of convenience stores will continue, it’s not guaranteed, particularly as consumer shopping trips decline, competing channels diversify and e-commerce grows.

The stereotypical convenience-store consumer, affectionately known as Bubba, is changing.

No longer is he solely young, white, male and blue collar. He is more ethnically diverse and, while always on the hunt for craveable foods, he’s increasingly looking for fresh, high quality foods made with “real” ingredients. 

This changing demographic spells opportunity for retailers, but understanding what motivates the modern Bubba is critical in tailoring offerings to meet those needs and desires.

“The consumers, they’re getting smarter,” says Shannon Harvey, food-service and dispensed beverage category manager for Ricker’s Convenience Stores. “They know what they want and that’s what they want.”

Ricker’s is now offering made-to-order breakfast, lunch and dinner options, including pizza, breadsticks, deli sandwiches and more to capture Bubba’s expanding palate and preference for foods with few artificial ingredients. 

“People want good food at a good price and they want to be able to customize it,” Harvey says. “We’re trying to change our mindset from a convenience store to think more like a restaurant.”

There’s no question that c-store consumers are buying more food. Twenty-five percent of consumers report purchasing more foodservice items at c-stores in the past month, largely at the expense of fast-food restaurants, according to Technomic’s Convenience Store Consumer Market Brief from the last quarter of 2016. Forty-nine percent of them are buying foodservice snacks, up 11% from the previous year, Technomic found.

Bubba is now demanding that c-stores stock better-for-you and socially responsible foods. Some 84% of consumers look for c-store snacks that are considered “fresh,” 81% seek out snacks labeled “clean” and 70% want snacks that are “real,” according to Technomic.

Bubba hasn’t stopped seeking out craveable options and is not grabbing low-calorie or ultra-healthy options when selecting c-store food.

“I can’t give a salad away,” Harvey says. “Everyone says they want to eat healthier but they pick up that craveable thing at the c-store.”

When trying to entice today’s Bubba, play up freshness cues, quality and real-ingredient claims in store signage, social media and other marketing materials. Accompany that with appealing images to add to item craveability.

 

Brought to you by Ruiz Foods